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The Language Centre

 

CULP: Languages for All - Korean

Korean

Alert:

Korea is located in the northeast of Asia between China, Japan, and Russia. The population is about 76.5 million people: 51 million in the South and 25.6 million in the North. Korea has four distinct seasons. The climate in the Korean peninsula is humid continental although it is humid subtropical in summer with a short rainy season. In winter it can be extremely cold with a lot of snow.

Short History

The history of Korea begins with the foundation of Gojoseon (고조선) in 2333 BC by King Dangun (단군). There is a well-known mythology associated with how the country was founded by this king (단군신화). Since the foundation, several kingdoms have existed in the Korean Peninsula prior to the modern-day Korean state: the three Kingdoms period of Korea (Goguryeo:고구려, Baekje:백제, Shilla:신라), Goryeo (고려) and Joseon (조선) in chronological order. The name ‘Korea’ is seen to be derived from Goryeo during which dynasty Korea came to be known to the western world. Toward the end of the Joseon Dynasty (in 1910), Korea was occupied by Japan. At the end of World War II (in 1945), the country was freed from the Japanese occupation, but was divided into two by political ideology: communist North and capitalist South, respectively backed by the former Soviet Union and the USA. A separate election was held in the South in 1948 which led to the creation of the Republic of Korea (ROK: 대한민국 or 한국), while the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established in the North. The Korean War broke out in 1950 between the two Koreas and a ceasefire was announced in 1953.

Since then, South Korea has gone through rapid economic growth and radical social/cultural changes. The country is currently one of the largest economies in the world.

The Korean Language

The Korean language is spoken as first language by about 80 million people: people in both Koreas and those living in two Korean autonomous districts in China. Its phonetic alphabet, Hangul (한글) was created in 1446 under the Great King Se-jong (세종).

Religion

Buddhism was the main religion until the Goryeo Dynasty but Confusionism was taken up as the national religion in the Joseon Kingdom. Christianity began to spread across the country in the 18th century and is the largest organised religion in South Korea today, although more than half of the population do not belong to any organised religion.

Pop Culture

Hallyu (한류: the Korean Wave) is a term to refer to the cultural phenomenon created by South Korean pop culture and which has swept across many Asian countries, and has more recently spread to the rest of the world. Since the late 90s, K-pop, South Korean TV shows (also known as K-dramas) as well as Korean films have gained widespread popularity.

Sports

Taekwon-Do is a martial art which originated in Korea and many Korean boys and girls learn this sport from an early age. Baseball, football and basketball are very popular too. Winter sports such as skating and skiing have gained popularity, partly due to a highly successful staging of the Winter Olympics in 2018. 

Food

Traditional Korean meals consist of rice (밥:steam-cooked short grain rice), thin broth or stew (국 or 찌개) and many side dishes (반찬). One of the main side dishes is Kimchi (김치: preserved Chinese leaves with salt, garlic and chilli power etc.). A lot of dishes contain garlic, chilli power, sesame oil or one or more traditional Korean sauces. Traditional Korean sauces include bean paste (Doenjang: 된장), chilli paste (Gochujang: 고추장), soy sauce (간장). Well-known dishes include Bulgogi (불고기: grilled marinated beef), Bibimbap (비빔밥: rice mixed with lots of vegetables, meats and sauce), Japchae (잡채: thin clear noodle dish with lots of vegetables, meat and soy sauce), Gimbap (김밥: similar to Sushi but with more varied fillings), Ddukbokgi (떡볶이: white chewy cylindrical rice cakes cooked with chilli paste), Sundae (순대: similar to black pudding but with clear noodles and some vegetables inside) and many more.


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Qualifications framework level: CEF A1 ALTE Breakthrough(*)

(*) Korean is an Asian language and does not fit neatly in the CEF as it features, when compared to European languages, an asymmetrical development of skills. This QF is therefore, for informative purposes only.

Prerequisites

For absolute beginners (ab initio learners) or for those with very little knowledge of the language.

Educational Aims

At the Basic 1 Level the main aims are:

    • to develop a basic understanding and an appreciation of the salient linguistic features;
    • to establish the learner as a fairly confident language user in a range of predictable every-day situations;
    • to introduce students to the cultural background of Korea within the context of language teaching.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the Course students will be able to:

Listening/Speaking Understand basic instructions or take part in a basic factual conversation on a predictable topic.
Reading Understand a set of basic notices, instructions or information.
Writing Write a brief informal letter or e-mail on an every-day predictable topic.

Programme Structure

The Course is delivered in blended-learning mode during the Michaelmas and Lent terms. It offers 30 hours of classroom tuition in groups (up to 20 students) and requires the students to study independently for additional 30 hours.

Topics

The Course introduces students to the following functions and notions:

  • Greetings
  • Introducing self, friends and family
  • Describing your nationality, age and profession
  • Talking about your daily life; expressing routines, about hobbies, free time activities, interests and expressing likes and dislikes
  • Telling the time
  • Shopping at the market or shop, inquiring about prices, size, quantity etc.
  • Describing future events/plans
  • Describing a dwelling, give/ask for address
  • Talking about work/study, the timetable
  • Understanding information relevant to travel, holiday and staying in a hotel
  • Ordering food or drink and paying the bill.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The courses are delivered in a blended-learning mode, face-to-face and online through a virtual learning environment (Moodle). The focus is on spoken, oral/aural communicative competence. Students are required to attend to online multimedia materials and read the proscribed texts in their own time so that the classroom time is dedicated to real-time face-to-face communication. Writing with accuracy is also taught and encouraged.

Resources

Students are provided with photocopied and digital resources produced and/or selected by the teachers and accessible via the Moodle site.

Student Support

The Language Centre has an open-access learning centre (the John Trim Centre) that houses electronic and paper-based language learning and reference materials in more than 180 languages. The Centre also has a dedicated team of Language Learning Advisers whose primary role is to actively support learners.

Managing Teaching Quality and Standards

Student evaluation takes place by questionnaire at the end of the Course. The class teacher marks all the exams while the exam papers and the marking scheme take into consideration the views of all the relevant teaching staff. The teachers also submit a Report. Informal student feedback is welcome and collected throughout the year. Teachers are observed by Co-ordinator/Director and feedback given.

Syllabus:

Korean Basic 1


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Qualifications framework level: CEF A1(*)

(*) Korean is an Asian language and does not fit neatly in the CEF as it features, when compared to European languages, an asymmetrical development of skills. This QF is therefore, for informative purposes only.

Prerequisites

CULP Basic 1 / CEFR A1 or those who have acquired a proficiency equivalent to these awards.

Educational Aims

At the Basic 2 Level the main aims are:

    • To further develop a understanding and an appreciation of the salient linguistic features;
    • To establish the learner as a fairly confident language user in a wider range of predictable every-day situations;
    • To enhance students’ understanding of the historical and cultural background of Korea within the context of language teaching.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the Course students will be able to:

Listening/Speaking Express simple opinions or requirements in a familiar context.
Reading Understand straightforward information in a familiar context.
Writing Make notes or write email on an every-day predictable topic.

Programme Structure

The Course is delivered in blended-learning mode during the Michaelmas and Lent terms. It offers 30 hours of classroom tuition in groups (up to 20 students) and requires the students to study independently for additional 30 hours.

Topics

The Course introduces students to the following functions and notions:

  • Introducing oneself, friends and family including information on nationality, academic study, profession and length of time they have been learning Korean for
  • Giving simple directions and instructions
  • Talking about etiquette in public places
  • Ordering food or drink and paying the bill
  • Reading and understanding a Korean recipe
  • Composing email
  • Sending a parcel in the post office
  • Telephone conversations
  • Talking about the weather and seasons
  • Apologising
  • Talking about past events and experiences

Teaching and Learning Methods

The courses are delivered in a blended-learning mode, face-to-face and online through a virtual learning environment (Moodle). The focus is on spoken, oral/aural communicative competence. Students are required to attend to online multimedia materials and read the proscribed texts in their own time so that the classroom time is dedicated to real-time face-to-face communication. Writing with accuracy is also taught and encouraged.

Resources

Students are provided with photocopied and digital resources produced and/or selected by the teachers and accessible via the Moodle site.

Assessment Methods

Formative assessment is provided through regular feedback during lessons. There will be two 15-minute class-based test worth 10% of the final mark each (lesson 7 and 13). Student will complete for homework four 15-minute online tests (Moodle) worth 5% of the final mark each.Summative assessment at the end of the Course is by examination (30% of final mark) for listening, reading and writing. There will also be a brief oral communication test (30% of final mark).

Student Support

The Language Centre has an open-access learning centre (the John Trim Centre) that houses electronic and paper-based language learning and reference materials in more than 180 languages. The Centre also has a dedicated team of Language Learning Advisers whose primary role is to actively support learners.

Managing Teaching Quality and Standards

Student evaluation takes place by questionnaire at the end of the Course. The class teacher marks all the exams while the exam papers and the marking scheme take into consideration the views of all the relevant teaching staff. The teachers also submit a Report. Informal student feedback is welcome and collected throughout the year. Teachers are observed by Co-ordinator/Director and feedback given.

Syllabus:

Korean Basic 2


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Standard - Michaelmas-Lent 2020/21

  Tuesday Friday
Basic 1 17:00 - 19:00  
Basic 2   17:00 - 19:00

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